What is Ubiquinol?

Ubiquinol (pronounced “you-bik-win-all”) is the reduced, active antioxidant form of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10).

Produced naturally within young and healthy bodies, Ubiquinol is CoQ10 that has been converted (“reduced”) for use in the cellular energy production process. Ubiquinol is directly associated with over 95 percent of the body’s cellular energy production – the energy your heart, lungs and other organs need to function at optimal levels.

In supplement form, Ubiquinol also helps protect the body’s cells from oxidative stress, which can cause damage to proteins, lipids and DNA.

In summary, Ubiquinol:

  • Promotes optimal heart health
  • Supports natural cellular energy production
  • Replenishes Ubiquinol levels depleted by aging, certain health conditions, and/or cholesterol-lowering medicines
  • Is more bioactive than Conventional CoQ10 (ubiquinone)

This article explains more about the Ubiquinol form of CoQ10.

What is ubiquinone?

Conventional CoQ10, also called ubiquinone, is the oxidized form of CoQ10. To assist in the production of cellular energy, our bodies must first convert ubiquinone CoQ10 into Ubiquinol – a process that gets more difficult for our bodies to complete as we age.

Most supplement brands have introduced CoQ10 products that use the antioxidant Ubiquinol form of CoQ10 because Ubiquinol doesn’t require any conversion inside the body and is more bioavailable than conventional CoQ10.

How is Ubiquinol different than conventional CoQ10 (ubiquinone)?

The Ubiquinol form of CoQ10 is vital to a healthy body.

Conventional CoQ10, also called ubiquinone, is the fully oxidized form of CoQ10. When you take this type of CoQ10 supplement, it must first be converted to Ubiquinol in order to assist with the production of cellular energy.

Converting conventional CoQ10 (ubiquinone) into Ubiquinol becomes harder and less efficient by age 40. Ubiquinol supplements require no further conversion inside the body, making them a more beneficial CoQ10 option for many people over the age of 40.

This article explains more about the two main forms of CoQ10.

What are the effects of low CoQ10 levels?

Because CoQ10 is required for the production of cellular energy, a decrease in this important coenzyme can compromise the aerobic function in muscles.

Low levels of CoQ10 may be associated with feeling tired or with occasional muscle cramps/discomfort. In addition, low CoQ10 levels can limit the amount of cellular energy your body produces.

Why do people take a Ubiquinol CoQ10 supplement?

Your body naturally produces conventional CoQ10, also known as ubiquinone, which is later converted by the body into Ubiquinol.

Ubiquinol is found in every cell of the body, including the heart and brain. The Ubiquinol form of CoQ10 is essential in the production of cellular energy and protection against oxidative stress. Your heart, lungs and other energy demanding organs require Ubiquinol to function at optimal levels.

Around the age of 40, the body has a harder time completing this conversion, which can result in decreased production of Ubiquinol. Additionally, while the Ubiquinol form of CoQ10 is naturally present in some foods, it may be difficult to consume adequate levels of Ubiquinol through the ordinary diet, especially as we age.

Also, some prescription medications (such as cholesterol lowering statins) may also decrease the amount of Ubiquinol CoQ10 in the body.

Because the body must still convert conventional CoQ10 into Ubiquinol to contribute to cellular energy production, taking a conventional CoQ10 supplement may not be enough if you are over the age of 40 or if you take cholesterol-lowering statin medicine.

A Ubiquinol supplement can replenish the Ubiquinol in your body more effectively than conventional CoQ10 because it is more bioavailable and already in the form required to assist with the production of cellular energy.

How does Ubiquinol CoQ10 work?

The Ubiquinol CoQ10 made by Kaneka is bioidentical to the Ubiquinol made naturally in the body. It assists with cellular energy production and, as an antioxidant, in providing protection from free radical damage (oxidative stress).

Ubiquinol works at the cellular level, transferring electrons in the all-important production of energy within the cells of the body, including the heart (which requires significant amounts of cellular energy to properly function).

What role does Ubiquinol CoQ10 play in my body and overall health?

The Ubiquinol form of CoQ10 occurs naturally in our bodies to assist with cellular energy production and provide protection against oxidative stress.

It is directly associated with over 95 percent of the cellular energy produced by the body. This means that without Ubiquinol, our bodies could not properly produce the energy we need to function—especially in our hearts, where a high concentration of Ubiquinol is found.

Ubiquinol CoQ10 promotes heart health by helping to provide the cellular energy needed to power the heart. Ubiquinol is critical in the production of ATP, the body’s primary fuel. This fuel is used for three basic yet critical heart functions:

  1. Contraction – to keep the heart pumping consistently
  2. Relaxation – to allow the heart to rest between beats
  3. Molecular Synthesis – to maintain the heart’s structure by building important cellular components

The energy demands of the heart are among the highest in the body. It takes energy for the ventricles of the heart to contract as they pump blood to the arteries, but it takes even more energy to relax the contracted muscle. The heart requires significant amounts of cellular energy to function. Without enough ATP in the “energy pool”, the heart’s function would be compromised.

The Ubiquinol form of CoQ10 is also a powerful antioxidant. It helps protect against oxidative stress caused by free radicals. Acting as an antioxidant, Ubiquinol can neutralize free radical cells that might otherwise damage healthy cells within the body.

In summary, Ubiquinol CoQ10:

  • Promotes optimal heart health
  • Supports natural cellular energy production
  • Replenishes Ubiquinol levels depleted by aging, certain health conditions, and/or cholesterol-lowering medicines
  • Is more bioactive than conventional CoQ10.
Is Ubiquinol a prescription medicine?

No. The Ubiquinol form of CoQ10 is a dietary supplement and the subject of nearly 60 published research studies.

What kind of research studies have been conducted on Ubiquinol?

For more than a decade, scientists and researchers have studied CoQ10 for safety and potential health benefits. The Ubiquinol form of CoQ10 is proven to support heart health. But because Ubiquinol has only been commercially available since 2007, scientists have only scratched the surface in understanding all the potential health benefits of this advanced form of CoQ10.

You can read more about Ubiquinol CoQ10 research findings here.

People taking cholesterol-lowering statin medicine often take Ubiquinol, too. Why?

Statin medicines work by inhibiting the body’s production of cholesterol. Because CoQ10 is formed via the same pathway as cholesterol, people who take a statin may have reduced levels of both conventional CoQ10 and Ubiquinol, the more advanced form of CoQ10.

Taking a Ubiquinol supplement helps replenish reduced levels of CoQ10 that may be associated with statin use. And because Ubiquinol is more readily absorbable by the body than conventional CoQ10, Ubiquinol is the preferred form of CoQ10 for statin drug users.

Here is an article that explains more about Ubiquinol CoQ10 and cholesterol-lowering statin medicines.

Please check with your doctor before starting to take any dietary supplement.

Who should take a Ubiquinol CoQ10 supplement?

Generally, men and women over the age of 40 should consider taking advantage of a Ubiquinol CoQ10 supplement.

When you take a conventional CoQ10 supplement, it must first be converted to Ubiquinol in order to assist with the production of cellular energy. The Ubiquinol form of CoQ10 is vital to a healthy body.

Converting conventional CoQ10 (ubiquinone) into Ubiquinol becomes harder and less efficient by age 40. Aging, certain health conditions and the use of cholesterol-lowering statins can decrease the body’s production of conventional CoQ10 as well as Ubiquinol.

Ubiquinol supplements require no further conversion inside the body, making them a more beneficial CoQ10 option for many people over the age of 40.

Where can I buy Ubiquinol?

The Ubiquinol form of CoQ10 can be found in thousands of health food stores, pharmacies and grocers. Retailers who specialize in vitamins and supplements will generally offer a wider selection of products containing Ubiquinol.

You can use our Store Locator to find a Ubiquinol retailer close to your home. You may also wish to read our free Ubiquinol Buyer’s Guide.

When and how much Ubiquinol CoQ10 should I take?

The recommended daily use of Ubiquinol varies based on each individual’s needs. However, those who are older or have health concerns may want to start supplementing with 200 mg of Ubiquinol CoQ10 per day. After about two weeks, 100 mg per day is thought to be a good maintenance dose.

Many people take their Ubiquinol CoQ10 supplement each morning with breakfast. If you take more than one Ubiquinol capsule each day, consider taking them at different eating occasions – for example, one capsule with breakfast and another with lunch.

Will Ubiquinol CoQ10 support healthy aging?

Yes. Because Ubiquinol levels drop as we age, we are no longer able to produce cellular energy as efficiently as when we were younger. Ubiquinol supplements can replenish Ubiquinol CoQ10 levels to provide the cellular energy your body needs to maintain health and well-being.

If I take a multivitamin, why would I need Ubiquinol CoQ10?

Most multivitamins do not contain Ubiquinol. In addition, unlike most other nutrients, Ubiquinol CoQ10 is fat-soluble (rather than water-soluble). This means it is best to be delivered in a soft gel with a fat such as sunflower, canola or olive oil.

If CoQ10 has been available for 30 years, why is Ubiquinol only recently available?

The Ubiquinol form of CoQ10 is difficult to commercially manufacture because the coenzyme is easily oxidized in the air, which converts it back to the inactive (conventional) ubiquinone form.

After years of research and using advanced technology, Kaneka was able to perfect a stabilization process that allows Ubiquinol to remain in its reduced, readily usable form without converting back into ordinary ubiquinone during the encapsulation process.

Who is Kaneka?

Since 1977, Kaneka Nutrients has commercially manufactured the only yeast-fermented and naturally-derived CoQ10—a CoQ10 that is bioidentical to the enzyme produced naturally in the body.

After 10 years of research, Kaneka Nutrients developed the world’s first and only Ubiquinol CoQ10 commercially available for use in supplements. Ubiquinol is proven to support heart health, and researchers continue to explore its other potential health benefits.

Kaneka makes Ubiquinol CoQ10 in the United States and Japan. It sells the nutrient to supplement companies who, in turn, use the ingredient in branded Ubiquinol supplement products.

How do I know if my supplement contains Ubiquinol made by Kaneka?

Kaneka ubiquinol quality sealUbiquinol CoQ10 products made with Kaneka’s Ubiquinol ingredient carry the Kaneka Quality Seal. Finding this seal on a Ubiquinol bottle means the brand is relying on Kaneka for a heart-healthy ingredient manufactured according to exceptional quality standards.

The Kaneka Quality Seal is backed by more than 30 years of history within the CoQ10 market. It is also backed by a state of the art production facility in Houston, where nutritional ingredients are made following a stringent quality assurance program based on the principles of “Kaizen” – the Japanese philosophy of continuous improvement.

Look for the Kaneka Quality Seal on your favorite brand of Ubiquinol supplement.

Can I get Ubiquinol from the foods I eat?

Yes. The Ubiquinol form of CoQ10 can be obtained from certain foods such as chicken, oily fish, whole grains, peanuts, spinach, avocados, olive oil and some other foods. However, the amount of Ubiquinol found in these foods is relatively small.

To get 100 mg of Ubiquinol CoQ10, for example, you would have to eat 50 cups of spinach or more than three pounds of peanuts.

In addition, when food is cooked, some or all of the Ubiquinol contained within it can convert back to the conventional ubiquinone form of CoQ10. This form of CoQ10 is harder for the body to absorb, and it must be converted back to Ubiquinol in order to be used in the body for cellular energy production.

For more information, read this article on foods that contain Ubiquinol.

Will a Ubiquinol supplement give me energy?

The Ubiquinol form of CoQ10 is directly associated with over 95 percent of the body’s cellular energy production, but it will not give you a sudden boost of energy as one would expect to feel from the consumption of a beverage containing caffeine.

The cellular energy production associated with Ubiquinol benefits the body by providing cellular energy that helps your heart, lungs and other organs to function at optimal levels.

Will Ubiquinol interfere with prescription medicine(s) that I take?

Ubiquinol CoQ10 can be safely taken with most prescription medications, but you should always check with your doctor before starting to take any dietary supplement, including Ubiquinol.