A woman trims flowers in her garden

Ubiquinol Bucket List — 5 Heart-Healthy Hobbies

Can you believe we’re already in the second month of 2019? Time flies! And speaking of time, it’s time to continue the Ubiquinol Bucket List series.

If you missed the big announcement in January, the Ubiquinol Bucket List series is all about setting health goals, trying new things, and thriving all year long. This month, we’re focusing on hobbies that support your heart health.

According to the American Heart Association, adults should get between 75 minutes and 150 minutes of exercise every week [1]. When choosing a hobby, find one that piques your interests while also inspiring you to get a little exercise.

A heart-healthy activity should challenge you, but it should also be practical. It’s also important to talk to your doctor about whether or not it aligns with your current and future health goals. Once you’re cleared, it’s time to get started!

What heart healthy hobby are you adopting this month? Head to our Facebook page for a chance to win one of two Apple Watches! Two winners will each receive an Apple Watch Series 4 (GPS). This giveaway will end Friday, Feb. 22, 2019, and we'll pick two winners before Feb. 28, 2019.

Download the Ubiquinol Heart Health Bucket List to track your progress!

Not sure which activity is right for you? Here are five heart-healthy hobbies you can consider:

Cycling

Although cycling is more of an exercise, it’s also a great hobby! Cycling doesn’t have to be strenuous; just take a 30-minute ride in your neighborhood or park. There are also many indoor cycling gyms, so you can continue even if it’s cold outside. Cycling can also help you cross off some other Ubiquinol Bucket List items, such as entering a race in your area. Once you start a cycling routine, you can build up the muscle and energy needed to do it for a longer amount of time.

Gardening

Another great activity is gardening — you can literally see the “fruits of your labor.” Gardening is a great hobby for those who need something less strenuous. And it’s also great for those wanting to relax in nature, get some fresh air, and take a break from the day-to-day. Find a beginner’s guide to gardening, then designate a spot in your yard or find a local community garden to bring it to fruition. Check out your local library to see if they offer a seed “checkout” program as well.

Water Aerobics

Water aerobics sometimes gets a bad rap. However, this kind of hobby is great for your heart, and it might even help you lose weight. Many community centers offer water aerobics classes you can join. It’s a fun activity to start your day off, or you can go on the weekends when you want to stay active without a super intense (and sweaty) workout.

Cooking

Like gardening, cooking is another activity that doesn’t require a lot of physical intensity. Whether you’re a kitchen newbie or you’ve been making your friends and family meals for years, cooking can be a fun challenge. If you aren’t a seasoned home chef, find classes in your city through kitchen stores or cooking schools! Cooking heart-healthy meals is a great way to support your health. You can find delicious and healthy recipes on our blog, as well as in our cookbook.

Walking or Hiking

Finally, consider starting a walking or hiking routine. This is a great way to explore new areas of your state, take in some fresh air, and support your overall health. Walking regularly can also help you lose weight. Start a walking regimen by going for a 15- or 30-minute stroll at least three times per week, and then build up to a daily walk. Challenge yourself to go a little farther each day if you’re comfortable increasing the intensity.

Read more tips for heart health!

Reference
[1] https://www.heart.org/en/healthy-living/fitness/fitness-basics/aha-recs-...

This article is for general educational purposes only and is not intended to be used as or substituted for medical advice.  Always seek the advice of your physician or qualified health care provider with any questions about your health or a medical condition.  Never disregard or delay seeking medical advice because of something you have read on the internet.